Archive for August, 2016

What’s New for Ally Week 2016?



By | blog, Events, LGBT, Straightlaced

What’s new for Ally Week 2016? This year we are focusing on supporting schools to help students examine how race, class, culture, and ethnicity impact any person’s experience when it comes to gender and sexuality.

Faces of Four Racially Diverse Youth

Faces of Four Racially Diverse Youth

Put yourself in the shoes of these high school students who appear in the film and analyze how their experience of gender norms is affected by their particular backgrounds.

Once again we are proud partners with the Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network (GLSEN) and Gay Straight Alliances everywhere for Ally Week, which will be September 26 – 30, 2016.

We are making our award-winning documentary, Straightlaced—How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up available to watch for free for the entire month.

 

Watch TrailerAlly Week 2016 (1)

Sign Up for Free Streaming

Order DVD and Curriculum Guide

Make Connections: Race, Culture, Gender, and Sexuality

You can also purchase the DVD and our comprehensive curriculum guide at 50% off for the entire month just by using discount code AWGS16 when you make your purchase.

Each DVD set comes with a free, 165-page curriculum guide on how to use the film to open up critical classroom discussions for middle, high school, and college students about the gender binary, homophobia, dating pressures, and much more.

The activities in the guide are correlated to National Sexuality Education Core Curriculum standards as well.

During Ally Week, participants across the country will consider what they can do to become an even better ally to another person, or group of people. Straightlaced, which explores the pressures that ALL teens face when it comes to dealing with gender norms and sexuality, is the perfect tool for sparking dialogue and community action around these issues. What’s new for Ally Week 2016? This year we are focusing on supporting schools to help students examine how race, class, culture, and ethnicity impact any person’s experience when it comes to gender and sexuality.

How We are Helping Reduce Suicide in Georgia



By | blog, Latest News, LGBT, Professional Development, Respect For All Project, Straightlaced

Did you see the recent New York Times article about how difficult daily life is for students who identify as LGBT? It’s alarming.

The Center for Disease Control finally did a study of high school youth who identify as LGBT.

40 percent of them have considered suicide.

Why?

  • They are three times more likely than straight students to have been raped.
  • They skipped school far more often because they did not feel safe;
  • At least a third had been bullied on school property.
  • They were twice as likely as heterosexual students to have been threatened or injured with a weapon on school property.

That’s why GroundSpark is stepping up our efforts to help prevent suicide among youth and young adults. Our professional development program which is centered around using Straightlaced—How Gender’s Got Us All Tied Up is proving to be an excellent way for educators to grasp what they can do to make school safer for all students who don’t conform to the so-called norms of gender and sexuality expression.

Mental health professionals who work in colleges and universities across the state of Georgia recently formed the Georgia’s College Suicide Prevention Coalition.

For their very first event, GroundSpark teamed up with our partner, SOJOURN (the Southern Jewish Resource Network), to provide a three-hour training.

GroundSpark Facilitators Serian Strauss and Eileen Nathanson introduce our Pyramid of Peace

Participants

  • learned the statistics about how heteronormativity increases suicide risks;
  • reflected on the early messages they received about LGBTQ people;
  • practiced responding to LGBTQ issues that commonly arise in their work setting;
  • unpacked stereotypes, assumptions, and concepts related to identity and intersectionality.

Scenes from Straightlaced brought youth perspectives into the room and helped jumpstart the dialogue.

Our lead trainer, Eileen Nathanson, knows that these kinds of exercises help mental health providers to understand what their clients may have experienced as well as increase their own self-awareness. “As a psychotherapist,” Eileen says, “I see the ongoing mental health impact of growing up in a world that largely communicates that we must hide or bury ourselves if we are to be safe and loved. Expanding our thinking about the impact of homophobia and rigid gender stereotypes allows us to better partner with students in all aspects of their healing.”

 

Participants stand back-to-back, waiting for their next prompt in our “pair-share” exercise. In this activity GroundSpark trainers present real life scenarios so participants can practice spontaneous responses to provide support or advocacy involving LGBT students or colleagues.

 

Do you want to bring a GroundSpark training to your university or network? For more info or to schedule a workshop or presentation in your area, please email us at info@groundspark.org and tell us a little bit about what you are looking for.