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Introducing the GroundSpark Blog!


By | Straightlaced

We are launching GroundSpark’s blog today in memory of Lawrence King, the eighth grader who was murdered by a fellow student in class a year ago simply because he didn’t conform to conventional ideas about what young men are supposed to look or act like.

We hope that by spreading the hope and wisdom of the young people in all of our Respect for All Project films — Let’s Get Real, That’s a Family!, It’s Elementary, It’s STILL Elementary, and now Straightlaced, — we can help ensure that young people like Larry King can safely and joyously discover whoever they truly are.

We look forward to seeing what you have to say on this blog. So don’t be shy — add your voice to and join in the dialogue about the power of film to spark culture change, especially for students in every school.

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Comments

  • This is awesome! Congratulations on a beautiful blog, looking forward to all the discussion this will sure generate.

    Comment by Maritza — February 20, 2009 @ 3:39 pm

  • I purchased That’s a Family and Let’s Get Real and have used them for several years to train my Before and After School Staff about family structure and bullying. They are both powerful, and they have both made my staff consider their own attitudes in a way that I don’t feel I could have accomplished on my own as their supervisor. Thanks!

    Comment by Sheila Barry — February 20, 2009 @ 3:55 pm

  • Thank you for your work and your voices.
    All children deserve to live without fear

    Comment by David Staskowski — February 22, 2009 @ 10:08 am

  • It’s the schools JOB to TEACH my child reading writing and arithmatic…ITS not their job to try to teach my child what they THINK is right…living a gay lifestyle is WRONG read your bibles people…leave all of those issues to MOM and DAD not the teachers and schools, besides if your gonna try to tell my kid @ his school that being gay is acceptable..then he can PRAY wherever he wants. I teach my child to hate the sin, not the sinner, it’s up to me to teach him those things not the “system”

    Comment by Amy — February 22, 2009 @ 7:12 pm

  • What an evening that was! The youth in the film were so thrilled to be part of this work. Their enthusiasm was palpable. Looking forward to the multiple ways they will be involved from the curriculum, to our peer-to-peer program… their true selves will be at the center of the incredible Straightlaced campaign that has only just begun….!

    Comment by Zeena — February 25, 2009 @ 5:15 pm

  • Thank God this video was not around when my child was in Kindergarten. I am disgusted that you even consider showing it to elementary age children. Children do not need to be exposed to sexual matters at such a young age. I am not sorry that I disagree with you about homosexuality as being “ok” I believe it is wrong. And you may disagree with me but I have as much right to say you are wrong as you have to disagree with me.((A big thank you to all the soldiers that give us that right) I am not saying that gays should be vilified or that they are evil. They have all the right in the world to live their life as they see fit. But I will fight to keep your propaganda out of my son’s school. Education should be for teaching children about math, english, science, literature, etc. They should not be teaching that it’s ok to have homo or hetro sex or even expound on the pluses of masturbation. Schools need to stick to education and leave socialization and morals up to parents.

    Comment by Teresita — March 28, 2012 @ 12:21 am

  • Your response to our work is fairly typical of those who oppose inclusive anti-bias education. Over the years since we began this work there has been much progress as parents increasingly understand that age-appropriate anti-bias education that addresses anti-gay stigma
    a) is about caring for each other as members of a community, not about sexual practices
    b) is respectful of religious differences and honors the beliefs in all major religious doctrine to “love thy neigbor”
    c) is part of what is needed today to help all students feel safe at school and equipped to be a contributing citizen in the diverse multicultural world in which we live.

    Comment by Debra Chasnoff, President/Senior Producer — March 28, 2012 @ 12:29 pm

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